Recent Cleaning Posts

Fall is in the air.

9/2/2020 (Permalink)

Fall is in the air, the kids are going back to school, there's a chill in the in the air, and if you're like most homeowners, fall also means an opportunity to spruce up your yard and cut down on the work you'll need to do when the weather turns warm again. It doesn't matter if you're a seasoned landscape professional or somebody who just wants their yard to look as good as it can with as little work as possible, everyone can benefit from backyard fall cleanup. A little bit of work in the fall will really pay off when spring rolls around again. 

  • Rake those leaves. Once the snow flies, an un-raked layer of leaves can get matted down over the turf and smother it all winter long. Raking or using a mulching mower in the fall helps avoid dead patches in the spring. But don't worry about getting every last leaf, especially in the garden. They help insulate plants, and as they decompose, they provide valuable nutrients.
  • Feed the grass. Fertilizing in the fall is like a day at the spa for your lawn. Using a slow-release fertilizer allows the grass to soak up nutrients and - just as important - spend the cool days and nights of autumn recovering from summer heat and stress. And building a healthy, rejuvenated lawn is one of the best ways to protect against heat, cold, drought, insects and other stresses.
  • Weed all about it. Weeding in the fall is probably the most valuable thing you can do to prepare for spring, and it's one that many people overlook. The good news: Pulling weeds used to be a backbreaking chore, but tools like the Weed Hound have come a long way from the tiny weeding forks of "the good old days." There's no reason to get down on your hands and knees and gouge at the turf. All you do is place the tool over the weed, step lightly on the footrest, and pull.
  • Remove thatch build-up. A build-up of aboveground roots called thatch prevents sunlight, oxygen and moisture from getting to the nutrient-hungry soil below. But it's easy to remove, especially if you don't wait until it overwhelms the yard. Just go at the yard with a dethatching rake in early fall, or for an easier - but more expensive - option, rent a power dethatcher.
  • Aerate. Heavy use throughout the summer can cause soil to become compacted. Perforating your lawn with small holes helps reduce compaction and lets water, air and fertilizer get down to the soil, which strengthens the grass plant's root structure. For smaller yards, a manual aerating tool that removes plugs from the turf while you step should be just fine. If you've got a larger yard, consider renting a power aerator.
  • Water trees and shrubs. Dehydration during the colder months is an all-too-common cause of tree damage, but it's easily preventable. To sustain them over the long winter, it's important to give trees a drink before putting them to bed. After they go fully dormant - but before the ground freezes - use a soaker hose or root irrigator to water them thoroughly.
  • Clean out your garden. Fruits and vegetables left in the garden can rot all winter long, and provide a comfy home for insect eggs. Gross? Not as gross as they'll be in the spring. Now's the time to get rid of diseased plants, too, but keep them out of the compost pile so the problem doesn't spread to the rest of your garden next year.
  • Plant spring bulbs. Fall is not all about closing up shop. It's also the perfect time to plant spring flowering bulbs like daffodils and tulips. But pay attention to the weather in your area; planting too early can cause bulbs to sprout before winter, and planting them too late can mean their roots don't have enough time to develop before the ground freezes.
  • Give your tools a tune-up. When it comes time to put away the backyard tools for the season, don't just shove them into the garage or shed. Spend a few minutes wiping them down and removing debris and dirt, then apply a light layer of oil to keep them from rusting over the winter. That way they'll be all set to go again come spring.

Old Man Winter may be on his way, but with a little work now, you can lay the groundwork for a happy, healthy backyard that's ready to thrive next season.

School Is Back in Session!!

9/1/2020 (Permalink)

Hallway/ Lockers Certified: SERVPRO Cleaned

Whether you're going back in person or schooling from home, SERVPRO of Beverly/ Cape Ann knows the importance of safety. But September is not only the month everyone goes back to class, as it is also National Preparedness Month! 

Different types of disasters and emergencies happen in communities across the country, but there are key steps that every household can take to be better prepared for them. Kids learn what to do at school so why not have some sort of a plan at home? Discuss how to prepare and respond to emergencies that can help at home, work, and school.

Some tips can include:

  • Make a clear plan of what to do in an emergency, and in case of evacuation.
  • Identify clear key roles for everyone in your house.
  • Have a list of all the important things you may forget when an emergency occurs.
  • Have a disaster kit assembled for everyone in your household.
  • Have an out of the area emergency contact person saved on a smartphone.
  • Sign up for emergency alerts.  

Practice evacuating your home twice a year, especially if you have kids, infants, people with disabilities and seniors. This makes it a routine and can make a real emergency situation less stressful.

SERVPRO of Beverly/ Cape Ann is here for you 

SERVPRO of Beverly/ Cape Ann is Ready to take on COVID-19

4/28/2020 (Permalink)

Grey Building White Sign SERVPRO of Beverly/ Cape Ann Takes on COVID-19

I know that the coronavirus has impacted all of us in some form, and has affected our everyday lives, and the ways we operate our businesses. So when Moynihan Lumber called us for help when one of their employees tested positive for COVID-19, SERVPRO of Beverly/ Cape Ann took action right away with our proactive deep cleaning and sanitization, to ensure the safety of their employees and customers. We're all in this together. We are here and ready to aid you in your time of need, providing these services so your facility can be cleaned and ready for your business to resume. 

 https://www.salemnews.com/coronavirus/moynihan-lumber-goes-to-delivery-only-after-employee-tests-positive-for-virus/article_3d9927f4-6ead-11ea-8eee-ff08e601e4d4.html 

Did you know? The air in your home is 10 times more dirty than the air outside.

9/23/2019 (Permalink)

During the Spring and Summer months, allergens accumulate and fill areas of your home with dust, dust mites, animal dander, mold and other unhealthy elements. Unless you address the situation now, the air quality will continue to deteriorate.

Your friends at SERVPRO of Beverly/ Cape Ann want to ensure that you and your home are properly prepared for the upcoming season. Therefore, we would like to offer you some helpful tips that will adequately prepare your property for the Fall:

  • Eliminate mold and mildew indoors by cleaning under the refrigerator, washing and disinfecting garbage cans, scrubbing bathrooms, and cleaning or changing shower curtains
  • Remove any wet debris from around the home, as mold spores are airborne particles that can easily float indoors
  • Schedule to have your chimney cleaned within the next month. Excessive buildup of creosote and debris, as well as miscellaneous branches, leaves and animal nests can create a dangerous situation as it increases the potential to spark a chimney fire.
  • Remember not to ignore your ductwork, vents and HVAC systems. Unnecessary dirt and debris can pose a serious threat to the health of your family if they are not properly maintained.

SERVPRO’s licensed technicians can provide all of the remediation and cleaning services necessary for the upcoming season. A proper cleaning will combat all particles that infiltrate your property and provide for a safe and worry-free environment by:

  • Enhancing your indoor air quality
  • Improving overall air circulation
  • Eliminating built-up dirt and contaminants
  • Extending the life of your heating and cooling systems

Call SERVPRO of Beverly/ Cape Ann at 978-927-8665 and rest easier this Fall knowing your property is clean and out of harm’s way.

FALL YARD CLEANING TIPS

9/19/2019 (Permalink)

Raking Leaves Welcome Fall Y'all
 

Aaaah, autumn. The kids are back to school, the leaves are turning, and a chill is in the air. If you're like most homeowners, fall also means an opportunity to spruce up your yard and cut down on the work you'll need to do when the weather turns warm again.

It doesn't matter if you're a seasoned landscape professional or somebody who just wants their yard to look as good as it can with as little work as possible, everyone can benefit from backyard fall cleanup.  A little bit of work in the fall will really pay off when spring rolls around.

  • Rake those leaves. Once the snow flies, an unraked layer of leaves can get matted down over the turf and smother it all winter long. Raking or using a mulching mower in the fall helps avoid dead patches in the spring. But don't worry about getting every last leaf, especially in the garden. They help insulate plants, and as they decompose, they provide valuable nutrients.
  • Feed the grass. Fertilizing in the fall is like a day at the spa for your lawn. Using a slow-release fertilizer allows the grass to soak up nutrients and - just as important - spend the cool days and nights of autumn recovering from summer heat and stress. And building a healthy, rejuvenated lawn is one of the best ways to protect against heat, cold, drought, insects and other stresses.
  • Weed all about it. Weeding in the fall is probably the most valuable thing you can do to prepare for spring, and it's one that many people overlook. The good news: Pulling weeds used to be a backbreaking chore, but tools like the Weed Hound have come a long way from the tiny weeding forks of "the good old days." There's no reason to get down on your hands and knees and gouge at the turf. All you do is place the tool over the weed, step lightly on the footrest, and pull.
  • Remove thatch build-up. A build-up of aboveground roots called thatch prevents sunlight, oxygen and moisture from getting to the nutrient-hungry soil below. But it's easy to remove, especially if you don't wait until it overwhelms the yard. Just go at the yard with a dethatching rake in early fall, or for an easier - but more expensive - option, rent a power dethatcher.
  • Aerate. Heavy use throughout the summer can cause soil to become compacted. Perforating your lawn with small holes helps reduce compaction and lets water, air and fertilizer get down to the soil, which strengthens the grass plant's root structure. For smaller yards, a manual aerating tool that removes plugs from the turf while you step should be just fine. If you've got a larger yard, consider renting a power aerator.
  • Water trees and shrubs. Dehydration during the colder months is an all-too-common cause of tree damage, but it's easily preventable. To sustain them over the long winter, it's important to give trees a drink before putting them to bed. After they go fully dormant - but before the ground freezes - use a soaker hose or root irrigator to water them thoroughly.
  • Clean out your garden. Fruits and vegetables left in the garden can rot all winter long, and provide a comfy home for insect eggs. Gross? Not as gross as they'll be in the spring. Now's the time to get rid of diseased plants, too, but keep them out of the compost pile so the problem doesn't spread to the rest of your garden next year.
  • Plant spring bulbs. Fall is not all about closing up shop. It's also the perfect time to plant spring flowering bulbs like daffodils and tulips. But pay attention to the weather in your area; planting too early can cause bulbs to sprout before winter, and planting them too late can mean their roots don't have enough time to develop before the ground freezes.
  • Give your tools a tune-up. When it comes time to put away the backyard tools for the season, don't just shove them into the garage or shed. Spend a few minutes wiping them down and removing debris and dirt, then apply a light layer of oil to keep them from rusting over the winter. That way they'll be all set to go again come spring.

Old Man Winter may be on his way, but with a little work now, you can lay the groundwork for a happy, healthy backyard that's ready to thrive next season.

How often do you need to clean?

1/24/2017 (Permalink)

How Often Do You Need to Clean?

With a busy schedule to keep, how often do you really need to clean your home? By taking care of these 6 little-thought-of places, you can keep your home at its best and healthiest.

We live in a fast-paced world. How often do you have time to strap on a bandana, gloves, and grab a squirt bottle?

If you want to keep your home healthy and beautiful, but don’t have the schedule for regular deep cleans, then here are the six main places you need to focus on to eliminate sneaky bacteria, and keep your place shining at a glance.

1. Microwave

Contrary to popular opinion, microwaving your food does not burn away bacteria enough to counterbalance the spray of food from crackling bacon or explosive chili. Leaving your microwave as the last kitchen appliance to clean is setting you up for a bout of food poisoning. Running a heavy sponge over its inner walls, and sending the glass plate through the dishwasher every two weeks will keep your microwave safe and healthy. If you haven’t done in it a while, apply some bleach to a rag for the first clean to burn out those long-term bacteria growths.

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2. Bath Tub

A report by Huffington Post speculates that a bathtub is even dirtier than your toilet. Bacteria lingering in your bathtub can cause more than a surprise bout of flu that takes you out of commission; harmful skin infections can be spawned off a bathtub left unattended, so be sure to give it a once-over with heavy soap once a week. If this is its first cleaning, hit it with some bleach to clear out the existing illnesses waiting to happen.

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3. Floor

The eye is instantly drawn to the floor when entering the room, so even if the rest of your home is pristine, a dirty floor will equate a dirty home. When you see an accumulation of pet hair and crumbs, it’s time to give it a once-over with a vacuum, and mop up dirt as you see it on your hardwood. However, filth can gather out of sight that leave floors unsafe for pets and children. Set a schedule to vacuum, or sweep and mop, once a week, and be guaranteed harmful mildew or grime lingering in your floor is eliminated. This will provide a smoother feel, and make it less of a daunting task when you do get around to a major clean.

4. Table Tops and Pictures

Forgetting to brush off your ceiling fan once in awhile can aggravate respiratory issues such as asthma, and bacteria naturally gathers on coffee tables and bedside stands — things we rarely clean our hands before touching. To prevent breathing problems with guests and to safeguard your health, take a rag with disinfectant to your picture frames and table tops. This leaves them shining, clean of dust, and bacteria free. For your ceiling fans, don’t go for the feather duster — it’ll only spread it around. Take a bath towel and wrap it around the blade, dragging it towards you so that the dust is collected rather than scattered. These 10 Unexpected & Damage-Free Decor Ideas make it even easier to have a stylish home that isn’t difficult to keep clean.

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5. Computer

You might run your virus scanner every week, but it’s not the insides of this home essential you need to worry about. A study conducted by CNN said that computer keyboards are over five times dirtier than our toilet seats, and while we all make sure to use a paper toilet when opening a public bathroom door, rarely do we put on gloves before using our laptops. Once a week, power down your digital buddy and don’t hold back in rubbing it down with a rag and disinfectant spray, scrubbing over the mouse while you’re at it.

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6. Kitchen Counters

We leave dishes and food on them, use them as impromptu seats, and our pets even have free range of counter tops when we’re not looking. Kitchen counters are more prone to bacteria than any other table top, so set aside a time for scrubbing with bleach and soap once a week. If you do dishes more often, then give the counters a once over with your sponge as you finish, and save the heavy-duty cleaning for once every other week.